Tag Archives: heart health

Top articles from our first 2 years. . .

IMG_8348rt5x7bwBW ARA labcoatAs we approach the two-year anniversary of our blog, we would like to thank all of our followers for supporting our efforts to promote heart disease prevention.  In 2 years, this site has been viewed over 7,000 times, and in over 70 countries!  We sincerely appreciate your support, as well as your feedback.

As we look back on nearly 50 posted articles, we wanted to share some of the most relevant and important posts. . . . and we look forward to continue promoting heart health in the future! (And remember as always. . . only your doctor can give you specific advice about your health issues).

Here are are our top 10 tips for a heart healthy diet, and also some great online resources about diet.

Is your heart as old (or older) as you? Find out how to calculate your Heart Age.

Here are some useful online resources about high blood pressure, along with a description of the optimal diet.eca284793cc89e389f347e0f41da895a

Here is some insight into the role of wine and heart health.

Here is an overview of CardioSmart, our favorite online resources for heart disease treatment and prevention.

Have you heard conflicting information on saturated fat? Here is some guidance as well as a discussion of low fat and low carb diets.

running shoesCan running be risky for your heart? Here is some information, as well as this article on the right “dose” of exercise heart heart – but maybe even just 5 minutes a day can help! And it even may help your spouse’s heart as well!

If you or a family member suffers from atrial fibrillation, here is a videotaped lecture that addresses the causes and treatment options for this common condition.

Finally, please check out our video blogging site, Vidoyen.com,  where we have posted several videos on heart prevention issues.

Thank you again for all of your support over the past 2 years, and for your interested in Heart Health awareness and prevention!

 

 

 

Heart Health News. . . You Can Use

IMG_8348rt5x7bwHere are some quick links to useful items in the news recently that reflect new findings on prevention and heart health:

Could drinking alcohol actually affect the way you exercise? Some new research described here suggests that could be the case – and in a positive way. 

The upshot? Because exercise and alcohol intake affect similar “pleasure” centers in our brain, you may actually be tempted to drink more in days you exercise – but people who drink moderate amounts of exercise also tend to exercise more regularly. . . and seem to be healthier. (see our earlier article about wine and heart health).

Is coffee good or bad for you? A new study described here looked at coffee intake and risk of death from various causes.

The upshot? Keep bringing on the java (and consider buying Starbucks stock!)

Can you be “too old” to exercise. . or get its benefits? Not according to new research. 

The upshot? Even in those over age 75, regular walking can reduce your risk of heart attack and stroke. So keep moving!

This article describes research into the link between weekend sleep and weekday sleep.

The upshot? Sleeping in late on weekends may feel good, but may have negative health consequences.

Remember. . only your doctor can give you specific health care advice. . so always check with your health provider if these articles (and the advice they contain) apply to you and your health situation. 

 

VIDEO: Which Exercise is Best for Preventing Heart Disease?

IMG_8348rt5x7bwRecently, I was asked by the online video blog, VIDOYEN, about the best exercise for heart prevention. Here is my 3 minute answer:

Cardiologist and Heart Health Advocate Kanny S. Grewal, MD answers Which Exercise is Best for Preventing Heart Disease? (3 minutes) – VIDOYEN.

 

Is “Too Much” Exercise Harmful? Some New Information. . .

IMG_8348rt5x7bwWe have known for some time that physically active individuals have a longer life span and are overall healthier than those who are sedentary.  This certainly extends to heart disease, where exercise clearly has a beneficial effect for both prevention and therapy. But more recent research into “extreme” levels of exercise, especially endurance running, is raising questions about whether it is possible to exercise too much. This is becoming a controversial and heavily debated topic in the world of sports medicine.

Recently, a new study was released which adds important information to this debate. This was a veryrunning shoes detailed study in Europe of individuals over many years to try to link the degree of jogging with overall mortality and cardiovascular health.  Called the Copenhagen Heart Study, this particular analysis identified over 1000 active joggers and followed them for over 12 years. Not surprisingly, those who exercise either mild or moderate amounts were healthier and lived longer than their sedentary counterparts. What was most interesting however, is that those who ran the most vigorously (defined as 4 or more sessions weekly, or high intensity sessions) actually did not have improved survival compared to the sedentary non-runners.  This suggests that perhaps more extreme levels of running may actually be harmful. In fact, other studies have suggested a similar connection, such as a higher risk of irregular heart rhythms in those who participate in extreme sports.  The study did have some limitations as it did not address other types of exercise, the participants were not randomized,  and the limited number of participants prevented detailed analysis and comparisons.

So, for overall wellness and heart health, what level of exercise should we recommend? Here are some guidelines:

1. Remember, always check with your physician or other health provider to determine whether physical activity is appropriate for your specific medical condition.

2. This study adds to the evidence that light and moderate exercise is clearly beneficial.  The current recommendation by the American Heart Association is 150 minutes a week of moderate exercise. That could include brisk walking, light or moderate jogging, or many other types of aerobic activity. However, as we previously reported, even very short sessions of exercise can be beneficial.

3. High-intensity exercise, defined as 4 or more sessions a week, or frequent sessions of very high intensity activity (for example, running > 7 MPH) , may not be optimal for long-term health and survival. There is still minimal evidence that this level of exercise is actually harmful, but the benefit may not be as high as for those that stick to moderate exercise.

4. For those who elect to perform higher intensity exercise, it may be reasonable to cycle the periods of high activity with “down time”or cross-training with other less-intense types of exercise. There is still really no evidence that any particular type of aerobic exercise is best, so an active lifestyle that focuses on a mix of activities may be optimal.

Other than perhaps diet, an active lifestyle is still the single most effective way to prolong our lives and prevent disease. We hope you will join the HeartHealth Docs in participating in the upcoming Capital City Half Marathon and the New Albany Walking Classic.

Here is a reference to the study mentioned and this article.

Here is our overview of exercise, and an additional article on the benefits of exercise.

A great prescription

BW ARA labcoatWe have written and posted about the heart health benefits of exercise at HeartHealthDocs – including programs like Cardiac Rehabilitation (Rehab)

heart to start book. In the book Heart to Start, Dr. James Beckerman, a cardiologist who lives in Portland, Oregon, writes a detailed prescription for anyone to use to start living heart healthy. The gut-check forward “What’s your legacy?” written by David Watkins is followed by patient examples, vignettes, and Beckerman’s own personal reasons for the book. The Warm Up, Work Out, Cool Down sections echo a training session, and take the reader through the paces – the what, why, how, for fitness assessment and growth toward heart & circulation health.

The chapter Cardiac Reboot asks “Got Rehab?” and points out the current reality that if you (the patient) don’t bring up cardiac rehab, “it is possible no one else will.” This relates to the low numbers (20-30%) of eligible patients being referred to cardiac rehab, and of those only 40% actually completing this effective treatment regimen.

Beckerman goes on to provide readers a toolkit for being active, while showing how an active lifestyle can be habit forming – and be maintained for years (ie. how not to get injured). The book will get you to your 5K and its finish & beyond, and will teach how nutrition, training, and balance (ie. strength conditioning in addition to walking/running) work together.

Dr. Beckerman gives powerful examples of what motivates him – for the book, and for his practice which includes the PlaySmart heart screening program. The proceeds from the sale of his book will support free heart screenings for kids.  The book will help anyone learn about and apply practical, inspiring information for exercise and heart health. A great way to multitask.

HeartHealth Docs Road Show. . .Promoting healthy kids

The HH Docs spent this past weekend in Indianapolis, presenting original research from Riverside Hospital. We performed a study analyzing the accuracy of cardiac ultrasound to detect a certain type of cardiac abnormality that may cause sudden death with exertion. Dr. Kyle Feldman, who collaborated on the study, presented the findings to over 300 attendees.

photo (1)

Capture

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information and a video on promoting heart health for athletes and active teenagers, see this article.

Our favorite website to learn about heart disease and prevention

IMG_8348rt5x7bwWhen someone learns that they, or a family member, is afflicted by heart disease, it is natural to seek out additional information. Unfortunately, the internet can be a source of both information and misinformation, and sorting through the web for relevant health information can be a daunting task. For both patients as well as their families, the most useful site we have come across (other than HeartHealth docs!) for education and understanding is  cardiosmart.org. This site was created by the American College of Cardiology

logo-cardiosmart-redblue(ACC)and has a wealth of information on the origins, therapies, and manifestations of various heart disease and disorders. Here are some of the key features that you may find helpful:

1. There are disease specific pages that explain various conditions and therapies, such as this page for heart attack, or this detailed explanation of atrial fibrillation.

2. For those who do not currently have a heart condition, but are curious about the risk for heart disease, there is a simple but accurate risk calculator.

3. For those taking cardiac medications, this section lists each medication, with information on dosing, side effects, etc.

4. Those who register here are able to set specific goals, received tailored advice about research and other treatments, and a specific plan for prevention.

Are you aware of other useful educational sites for Heart Disease? If so, please let us know, and help the spread the message of prevention!